Category Archives: SF Pride

Family-Friendly Pride Events, Extended Bay Area Edition!

Folks, it’s Pride-a-palooza time! A month filled with opportunities to connect with other LGBTQ families, as the (school-aged) kids finish off the school year and the summer busts into view.

Below are a dozen family-friendly events you can attend to get your pride on with your little ones. Have fun!


A’s Pride Night

June 6
Oakland Coliseum,
7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland
7pm-9pm

More info / Register now!

 

 



San Mateo Pride

June 10
San Mateo Central Park,
50 East 5th Ave, San Mateo
12pm-4pm

More info / Register now!

 

 

 

LGBQIA Pride Storytime

June 10
Ortega Branch Library, 3223 Ortega St.,
San Francisco

12:00pm-1:30pm

Visit the library for a special family storytime and craft project celebrating LGBTQIA Pride and all kinds of families. The program will be aimed at kids and families from preschool to age 8, but everyone is welcome. No registration is necessary, just show up. Email maggie.frankel@sfpl.org if you have any questions.


Queer Women of Color Film Festival

June 10-11
Brava Theater Center,
2789 24th St, San Francisco

Childcare at closing night screening

More info / Register now!

 

 

 

City of El Cerrito Loving Day Celebration

June 11
El Cerrito City Hall Civic Plaza, 10890 San Pablo Avenue, El Cerrito
12:00pm-3:00pm

Loving Day honors the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia, the case that overturned the ban on interracial marriage. This FREE event will have activities for the whole family, including music, arts and crafts, photo booth fun, and a free screening of the documentary “The Loving Story.” More info at el-cerrito.org/lovingday.

Drag Queen Story Hour!

June 17
Bernal Heights Branch Library, 500 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco
12:00pm

RADAR Productions and SFPL present Drag Queen Story Hour. Join us for a unique and unforgettable story hour with special guest Yves St. Croissant! Includes face painting, songs and more! For children ages 0-5 and their caregivers. Please call 415-355-5618 or email paula.heaney@sfpl.org  for more information.


Frameline Family Matinee: “The Lego Movie”

June 18
Roxie Theater, 3117 16th St.,
San Francisco

10:30am

More info / Register now!

 

Frameline Family Interest
Movie: “The F Word”

June 18
Roxie Theater, 3117 16th St.,
San Francisco

1:30pm

June 20
Elmwood Theater, 2966 College Ave,
Berkeley

7:00pm

More info / Register now!

 


Coming Up Queer

June 18
Victoria Theater, 2961 16th St.,
San Francisco

1:30pm

More info / Register now!


Trans March

June 23
Hellen Diller Playground,
Dolores Park, 19th St. at
Dolores St., San Francisco

Family Activities 2-5pm,
March 6pm

More info / Register now!

 
Dyke March
Playground Brunch

June 24
Hellen Diller Playground,
Dolores Park, 19th St. at
Dolores St., San Francisco

10am-12pm

More info / Register now!

 

 

 

Drag Queen Story Hour!

June 24
Dimond Recreation Center
3860 Hanly Rd., Oakland
10:30am

Celebrate Pride weekend at the Oakland debut of Drag Queen Story Hour, with face painting, cookies – and stories and songs led by Black Benatar! Black Benatar thinks kids are the best and loves reading books to them that celebrate lgbtq and multicultural families and identities.

More info / Register now!


SF LGBTQ Pride Parade & Family Garden

June 25

LOWER MARKET STREET AREA, STEP-OFF BLOCK TBA

March in the LGBTQ Family Contingent at the SF Pride Parade! Our precise gathering time and block are TBA; watch out website for details in mid-June.

CIVIC CENTER PLAZA PLAYGROUND,
CORNER OF POLK ST. AND McALLISTER RIGHT IN FRONT OF CITY HALL

Join in fun art activities, face painting, and more at the Family Garden, open from 11am – 4pm.

More info / Register now!


Celebrate Pride Month by Using Your Health Insurance

#Out2Enroll
Los Angeles Marriott Burbank, Burbank

The Affordable Care Act has made a significant difference in the lives of millions of LGBTQ individuals and families. Millions of LGBTQ people across the country have benefited from the Affordable Care Act. Many have gotten health insurance for the first time, gotten covered as a family for the first time, received financial help to make coverage more affordable, and accessed covered health services, including transition-related care, for the first time. Use Pride month to show that the Affordable Care Act is working for our communities and to push back against Congress’ efforts to repeal or weaken the law. Learn more at out2enroll.org.

 


Rainbow Storytime

June 25
Merced Branch Library, 155 Winston Dr.,
San Francisco

2:00pm – 2:30pm

Join the library for a special family storytime celebrating LGBTQIA Pride. Email kimberly.lauer@sfpl.org for more information.

 

 

Gender Odyssey Los Angeles

June 28-20
Los Angeles Marriott Burbank, Burbank

Gender Odyssey Los Angeles is a two-day conference for Professionals seeking to advance their understanding of gender diversity and transgender identities in children, teens, and adults. Leading experts will offer sessions covering gender identity across the lifespan and life experience. Programming is targeted toward medical and behavioral health care providers, teachers and school administrators, social workers, care givers and guardians, attorneys, employers and recruiters, government employees, and students preparing for these professions. Offering CEUs for California Fiduciaries & Guardians and CMEs (pending approval). More info on the Gender Odyssey site.

 


Save the Date:
Family Pride Day at
Habitot

July 30
2065 Kittredge St., Berkeley
10am-1pm

 



Save the Date:
Oakland Pride & Family Garden

September 10

Thanks for Making Pride 2015 a Success – and a preview of our pics!

soproudsograteful

IMG_9658

Dear Families and Friends,

Wow! This year’s Pride was incredible, as the whole Bay Area celebrated our victory in the Supreme Court last Friday. Hundreds of kids – including more teens than ever – gathered with parents, grandparents, caregivers, friends, and allies at both the Parade and in the Family Garden. I had such a great time at Pride this year. The energy was electric and fun.

DSC_9468I know our work is important to you because it impacts that which is most precious to you: your kids. I am asking you to please make a donation to Our Family Coalition so that we can continue to do all we do for our families and build on our momentum for change.

_MG_6448The nationwide right to marry offers hope for the future of our children. We cannot stop here. We need your financial support to continue the momentum for our families.

Thank you so much for celebrating this historic Pride with us!  Every one of us makes a difference.

In gratitude,

PS: We are so glad to hear that your family and friends also had a great time at Pride. Please share your photos and great memories on our Page to inspire other families! See you at Oakland Pride on September 13! #familypride #proudofmyfamily.

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P1060509

The Alphabet Soup – Episode 3: Pride Edition

In this episode of The Alphabet Soup with Our Family Coalition we discuss Family Pride. QMOC Anayvette Martinez and her daughter Lupita share their inspiration and goals for the amazing group the Radical Monarchs. Then, Captain Chris Armijo, a fierce advocate and single gay dad of twin girls, speaks about creating inclusive spaces for his family in Texas

Featuring:
Anayvette Martinez, Community Organizer, Parent and Advocate & Lupita Martinez
Chris Armijo, Parent, Captain & Advocate

Host: Judy Appel, Our Family Coalition’s Executive Director

Food for Thought with:
Polly Pagenhart, Our Family Coalition’s Family Programs Director

5 Pride Pro-tips for Pride-Rookie Parents

This piece was originally published on the OFC Blog on June 24, 2014. It is re-posted here with current links for the 2015 Pride extravaganza!

Polly at Pride

Polly at Pride

If this your first Pride with your family, you’re probably wondering how you’re going to get through the day with your good humor — and your wee charges – intact. And for good reason!

The downside of pride-as-a-parent: it’s not the same as when you were a footloose, fancy-free non-parent. The parade route covers nearly a mile and a half, which amounts to a half-hour walk on hard pavement even before you factor in the pre-parade wait and the stop-and-go of parading.

The pride-as-a-parent upside, especially if you march with the OFC contingent: it’s nothing short of transcendent, walking up Market Street with your whole family, watching your children be cheered on by rainbow flag-waving strangers like they’re astronauts returning from the moon.  The supply of pride from that s/hero’s welcome lasts a year, and is well worth what you go through to enable your kids to experience it.

If you make it to the Family Garden (or go there directly), you’ll be greeted by a veritable sea of our families, safely frolicking inside our very own playground.  We’ll have healthy snacks and beverages inside there, plus our own port-a-potties (not to be underestimated!). Also: balloon animals, face painting, story time, and play structure fun.

So! For all pride-rookie parents, here are five essential things to remember:

  1. Bring food and water.

  2. Bring wheels, if you can.

  3. Remember sun protection.

  4. Attach an ID to the little ones.

  5. Create an exit strategy and end on a good note.

1. Bring food and water. This one’s close to a parental no-brainier: it’s a warm, sunny June day, and even in the most minimalist of scenarios you’ll be out in the elements for hours plural. We’ll be distributing some water at the contingent gathering spot, but even so, be sure to bring enough water to hydrate yourself and your little ones. Plus do bring easy-to-carry healthy snacks to curb the hunger pangs.  We’ll be selling healthy snacks and smoothies at cost in the Family Garden, so just hold it together ‘til you get there!

2. Bring wheels, if you can. The only thing nearly as important as food & water are wheels, any wheels, whatever wheels you’re able bring to the parade site & schlepp back home: stroller (no big kid is too big if they can jam into it!), wagon, scooter, tricycle, skateboard, roller blades, bikes: whatever conveyance you can bring that will ease the mile, bring it! I even saw a family with a custom rig: someone attached wheels to the bottom of a crib, and they rolled that ’til it gave up the ghost half-way up the street.

3. Remember sun protection. It’ll be sunny, and sun protection of any & all sorts is in order: wide-brimmed hat; sunglasses; sunscreen. Again: it’s going to be hours in the sun on a fine June day. Don’t overheat or burn.

4. Attach an ID to the little ones. Whether you go low-tech and write your name (not the kids’ name) and cell phone number on their little forearms, or you affix one of those ID wristbands on ’em, or you somehow securely attach a laminated card to your kid’s person, be sure there is a super-clear way for someone to know to contact you in the unlikely yet very upsetting event you’re separated.

5. Create an exit strategy and end on a good note.  Talk together as a family about what to expect from Pride, and how much is going to feel like enough. Reading through Gayle Pitman’s fantastic new book This Day in June would be fantastic prep; she’ll be in the Family Garden this year reading from the book and hanging out with families. Agree in advance how you’ll decide when it’s time to go, whether it’s the grown ups or the kids who are supersaturated. It’s a thrilling day, but for years, my own family simply marched up Market Street and then dropped down into BART at Civic Center, as full as we could manage. One of the key tenets of dog training is “End on a good note!” so that the most recent memory is a positive one. That goes for Pride, too.

Together we can make this the Best! Pride! Ever!

By Polly Pagenhart, Family Programs Director at Our Family Coalition
Polly also blogs at Lesbian Dad

5 Pride Pro-tips for Pride-Rookie Parents

Polly at Pride

Polly at Pride

If this your first Pride with your family, you’re probably wondering how you’re going to get through the day with your good humor — and your wee charges – intact. And for good reason!

The downside of pride-as-a-parent: it’s not the same as when you were a footloose, fancy-free non-parent. The parade route covers nearly a mile and a half, which amounts to a half-hour walk on hard pavement even before you factor in the pre-parade wait and the stop-and-go of parading.

The pride-as-a-parent upside, especially if you march with the OFC contingent: it’s nothing short of transcendent, walking up Market Street with your whole family, watching your children be cheered on by rainbow flag-waving strangers like they’re astronauts returning from the moon.  The supply of pride from that s/hero’s welcome lasts a year, and is well worth what you go through to enable your kids to experience it.

If you make it to the Family Garden (or go there directly), you’ll be greeted by a veritable sea of our families, safely frolicking inside our very own playground.  We’ll have healthy snacks and beverages inside there, plus our own port-a-potties (not to be underestimated!). Also: balloon animals, face painting, story time, and play structure fun.

So! For all pride-rookie parents, here are five essential things to remember:

  1. Bring food and water.

  2. Bring wheels, if you can.

  3. Remember sun protection.

  4. Attach an ID to the little ones.

  5. Create an exit strategy and end on a good note.

1. Bring food and water. This one’s close to a parental no-brainier: it’s a warm, sunny June day, and even in the most minimalist of scenarios you’ll be out in the elements for hours plural. We’ll be distributing some water at the contingent gathering spot, but even so, be sure to bring enough water to hydrate yourself and your little ones. Plus do bring easy-to-carry healthy snacks to curb the hunger pangs.  We’ll be selling healthy snacks and smoothies at cost in the Family Garden, so just hold it together ‘til you get there!

2. Bring wheels, if you can. The only thing nearly as important as food & water are wheels, any wheels, whatever wheels you’re able bring to the parade site & schlepp back home: stroller (no big kid is too big if they can jam into it!), wagon, scooter, tricycle, skateboard, roller blades, bikes: whatever conveyance you can bring that will ease the mile, bring it! I even saw a family with a custom rig: someone attached wheels to the bottom of a crib, and they rolled that ’til it gave up the ghost half-way up the street.

3. Remember sun protection. It’ll be sunny, and sun protection of any & all sorts is in order: wide-brimmed hat; sunglasses; sunscreen. Again: it’s going to be hours in the sun on a fine June day. Don’t overheat or burn.

4. Attach an ID to the little ones. Whether you go low-tech and write your name (not the kids’ name) and cell phone number on their little forearms, or you affix one of those ID wristbands on ’em, or you somehow securely attach a laminated card to your kid’s person, be sure there is a super-clear way for someone to know to contact you in the unlikely yet very upsetting event you’re separated.

5. Create an exit strategy and end on a good note.  Talk together as a family about what to expect from Pride, and how much is going to feel like enough. Reading through Gayle Pitman’s fantastic new book This Day in June would be fantastic prep; she’ll be in the Family Garden this year reading from the book and hanging out with families. Agree in advance how you’ll decide when it’s time to go, whether it’s the grown ups or the kids who are supersaturated. It’s a thrilling day, but for years, my own family simply marched up Market Street and then dropped down into BART at Civic Center, as full as we could manage. One of the key tenets of dog training is “End on a good note!” so that the most recent memory is a positive one. That goes for Pride, too.

Together we can make this the Best! Pride! Ever!

By Polly Pagenhart, Family Programs Director at Our Family Coalition
Polly also blogs at Lesbian Dad