Tag Archives: policy

The Equal Protection for All Families Act is one step closer to becoming the law!

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This Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to pass the Equal Protection for All Families Act (Assembly Bill 960). This important bill – authored by Assemblymember David Chiu and co-sponsored by Our Family Coalition, the National Center for Lesbian Rights, and Equality California – is expected to be voted on by the full Senate in two weeks and will continue to move towards the governor for signature. And we need YOU to make sure the Equal Protection for All Families Act becomes the law of the land.

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At present, California’s laws regarding assisted reproduction are outdated and fail to recognize the diverse ways that families are formed and to provide legal protection and security for parents and children alike. Unmarried parents who use assisted reproduction to conceive children in the privacy of their home are not recognized as the legal parents of their children. The new bill would update the current assisted reproduction laws in the state to ensure parents and their children are not at risk and do not have to jump through unnecessary legal hoops in order to secure what should be a basic right.

AB960will

  • Allow unmarried people using assisted reproduction to be fully recognized as parents on the same terms as married parents.

  • Remove the requirement that couples must involve a doctor when using assisted reproduction in order to ensure that the donor is not a parent.

  • Provide clear direction for how egg and known sperm donors should be treated under California law; protecting both parents and donors from very real concerns.

“This bill is about granting recognition and economic access to all prospective parents, ” says Renata Moreira, Our Family Coalition’s Acting Executive Director.” AB 960 is going to particularly benefit lower income LGBT parents who will be able to use more affordable methods of assisted reproduction, and still be protected under California law.” By failing to provide legal protections for these families, the state is failing both parents and children. All families deserve equitable protection and recognition under the eyes of the law.

As we continue to advocate for the passage of AB960, we call on you – LGBTQ parents who may have been affected by the current discriminatory legislation and may be ready to speak out. Personal stories and testimony have a powerful impact on lawmakers and can play a key part for the decision to pass the Equal Protection for All Families Act. Specifically, Our Family Coalition is looking to connect with:

  • Parents of any relationship recognition status who used home insemination, then had to terminate the donor’s rights and do a second parent adoption in order to be protected.

  • Unmarried or unregistered domestic partnered couples using assisted reproductive technology to conceive who had to adopt to protect their parental rights.

  • Potential donors who were afraid to support a friend or relative’s family formation due to the informality of the arrangement and the prohibitive costs of intervention by doctors or lawyers.

Do you recognize yourself or anyone you know in any of these descriptions?

Are you willing to share your story to help lawmakers make the right decision for families in California?

Please contact policy@ourfamily.org if you want to support for the Equal Protection for All Families Act and help shape the future of our families.

 

Standing together for change; lessons from Ferguson

policy-angerisalegitimateresponse

michaelbrownDear families and friends,

We are angry. As an organization committed to “equity for all families and children,” we cannot sit on the sidelines while our Black youth continue to face violence from those empowered to uphold the law, generation after generation.

We are hurt. Let us hold, for a moment, how it must feel to lose a child to violence; hold, if you can, how Michael Brown’s family feels at this very moment. Let what you feel strengthen the compassion that binds all of us together, parent to child and parent to parent.

We are saddened. The wounds inflicted in communities of color in our country are deep and old. In an effort to divert attention from the injustice served, the media coverage  – of predominately peaceful, youth-led protests against institutionalized racism – has sensationalized the response of our communities and powerful organizing work done by so many in the hundred days since Michael Brown’s murder.

As a social justice organization, we stand for the protection of all children. We stand with the victims’ families. And we call for action and justice.

Let us continue talking to all of our children about racism, how we can fight it, and how being an ally is a powerful tool for peace. At the same time, we:

  1. Commit to connecting with and listening to families everywhere who are being marginalized and whose voices are still not being heard.
  2. Ask our policy makers and government officials to change these archaic and oppressive systems; they must not shrink from action during these troubled times.
  3. Encourage you to continue the dialog on how LGBTQ communities can best stand in solidarity with racial justice movements.

Our hearts go out to Michael’s family and the greater community as we mourn, seek justice, and work together for change.

In solidarity,

Our Family Coalition’s Team

PS: Do you have innovative ideas that can help Our Family Coalition expand this often challenging, yet transformative, intersectional work? Talk to us! Email recommendations, along with your name and contact information, to policy@ourfamily.org. Thanks!

 

Lessons Learned: Ashley’s reflections on being OFC’s Policy Intern

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I open the door with butterflies in my stomach. It’s not every day that you get to follow your dream by applying to a policy internship at a progressive nonprofit. It’s not every day that you get the internship, apply for a stipend, find housing, and move across the country, all in one month. I followed a career-related whim to work as the Public Policy intern at Our Family Coalition and it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

My heart pounds as typical vestiges of doubt rear their ugly heads. “What if you’re not good enough?” “What if it’s too hard?” “What if the staff is mean because you’re the mew intern?”

All of my fears were quickly put to rest as I met Renata Moreira. The quick talking, but even quicker-witted, Policy and Communications Director welcomed me with open arms. Staff members were quick to introduce themselves with genuine smiles and fun tips on where to visit in San Francisco. I was visiting OFC to get a feel for the office and discuss the specifics of my internship, but before I knew it, I had tickets to go to QWOCMAP, a queer, women of color film festival. I also received an invite to an alternative networking mixer for prospective LGBTQ parents.

All of this before my first day of work! I was overwhelmed, to say the least, but I couldn’t shake the fact that I was overjoyed. Not only was the work environment welcoming, but everyone knew their stuff. As a student leader at Washington University in St. Louis, I am used to working with some of the best and brightest academics in the country; however, to be in a work environment with an array of individuals well versed on advocacy, law, communications, and educational policy made me feel like I was going to leave this internship with more than I had hoped.

AshleyPullQuote1Before long, I started my first official day and was imbued with knowledge of local, state and national laws and policies that affect millions of LGBTQ individuals across the country. I was aware of some of the policies because of my interdisciplinary background in Urban Studies, but most of the information was new due to the mutable nature of our justice system. Working at OFC requires knowledge of these policies and an ability to brainstorm effective ways to combat said policies’ bias and discrimination. One of the main projects that I have been working on, the Reframing Our Families Project, utilizes my organizational, people, time-management and oral communication skills all in one. At first, working on the Project seemed daunting, but with help from Renata and Judy Appel, OFC’s Executive Director, I felt equipped to break down the Project’s main components and develop efficient strategies to complete them.

Besides the beautiful view from the office, there are two things that I will definitely take away from this experience.The first is that the policies in this country need some serious work. Let’s be honest! States like Virginia don’t even allow unmarried couples to adopt and since same sex marriages are not legally recognized in Virginia, LGBTQ couples in the state are not legally allowed to adopt children. Though this may change in due time, this means that, currently, more unplaced children will be denied loving and welcoming homes because of legal bias and discrimination. The more work and research that I do, the more I learn about the significant challenges I will have to overcome as I form my own family. But as I work, I am in awe of the seemingly furtive battles that have already been championed on my behalf.

AshleyPullQuote2The second is that our society needs organizations like Our Family Coalition. As one of the only organizations that deal with LGBTQ headed families, OFC is a rare, but essential gem dedicated to the advancement of LGBTQ individuals and their families. After discovering policies like those in Virginia, I began to develop a large sense of doubt in our political system. However, working at this internship reassured me that there are a slew of organizations, both locally and nationally, fighting for the rights of LGBTQ people everywhere. Being able to say that I was a part of one of them, is truly an honor.

Overall, this internship was a lot of work mixed in with a lot of fun. I’ll be honest, it’s not for everyone. But if you are committed to LGBTQ equality and social justice, then it will be for you, too.